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Wednesday, December 8

  1. page Diet and Alzheimer's Disease edited ... I found this headline to be much more ‘news’ than ‘noise’. The writers did a very good job on …
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    I found this headline to be much more ‘news’ than ‘noise’. The writers did a very good job on summarizing the peer-reviewed article from which it was based and made understandable connections. It is phrased well for consumers to understand and not get confused about the results. I do believe more studies are needed to truly understand what the mechanisms of Alzheimer’s are but this is very promising and the article Fatty Diet Could Cause Alzheimer’s at least gets consumers more aware of what risk factors could impact their mental health.
    Sherwood; Nutritional drink, imaging show promise for Alzheimer's; CNN.com
    ...
    (225 patients 52-92-years-old were involved
    Some components of Souvenaid (DHA, uridine, and choline) when taken together have been shown to have restoration effects on brain synapses in rats, but these results have not been replicated to provide additional credibility to this result (Wurtman, 2006). Also, the results from this study do not necessarily mean that these nutrients have the same impact in humans from Souvanaid, like the news article portrays. Other components of the medical drink include vitamins C and E. Studies have shown that these two antioxidant vitamins when taken together is associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (Zandi, 2004). This supports the theory that taking these everyday, such as in a medical drink like Souvanaid, may decrease symptoms related to Alzheimer’s disease.
    This headline from CNN is more “noise” than “news” after looking at the facts. The main reason for my opinion is because, although the medical drink shows much potential, it is still in the preliminary stages of research. More studies must be done to confirm their results. Many news articles, in general, are published on studies that are so preliminary that nothing can really be taken as fact from them but are portrayed as fact to the general public. This is one of the major sources of confusion for the public when it comes to nutrition and health. Although the separate components of the Souvanaid drink have been associated with a decrease in some symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, studies on the drink itself are limited. Because this is such a preliminary study, more studies must be done to validate results before any conclusions can be drawn. Another thing to consider is the fact that Groupe Danone, the company that would make a profit from selling Souvenaid, is funding the Scheltens study. Because of this, results may be influenced.
    (view changes)
    6:18 pm
  2. page Diet and Alzheimer's Disease edited ... I found this headline to be much more ‘news’ than ‘noise’. The writers did a very good job on …
    ...
    I found this headline to be much more ‘news’ than ‘noise’. The writers did a very good job on summarizing the peer-reviewed article from which it was based and made understandable connections. It is phrased well for consumers to understand and not get confused about the results. I do believe more studies are needed to truly understand what the mechanisms of Alzheimer’s are but this is very promising and the article Fatty Diet Could Cause Alzheimer’s at least gets consumers more aware of what risk factors could impact their mental health.
    Sherwood; Nutritional drink, imaging show promise for Alzheimer's; CNN.com
    ...
    Alzheimer’s disease (225 patients were involved in the study) (Scheltens, 2010).
    Some components of Souvenaid (DHA, uridine, and choline) when taken together have been shown to have restoration effects on brain synapses in rats, but these results have not been replicated to provide additional credibility to this result (Wurtman, 2006). Also, the results from this study do not necessarily mean that these nutrients have the same impact in humans from Souvanaid, like the news article portrays. Other components of the medical drink include vitamins C and E. Studies have shown that these two antioxidant vitamins when taken together is associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (Zandi, 2004). This supports the theory that taking these everyday, such as in a medical drink like Souvanaid, may decrease symptoms related to Alzheimer’s disease.
    This headline from CNN is more “noise” than “news” after looking at the facts. The main reason for my opinion is because, although the medical drink shows much potential, it is still in the preliminary stages of research. More studies must be done to confirm their results. Many news articles, in general, are published on studies that are so preliminary that nothing can really be taken as fact from them but are portrayed as fact to the general public. This is one of the major sources of confusion for the public when it comes to nutrition and health. Although the separate components of the Souvanaid drink have been associated with a decrease in some symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, studies on the drink itself are limited. Because this is such a preliminary study, more studies must be done to validate results before any conclusions can be drawn. Another thing to consider is the fact that Groupe Danone, the company that would make a profit from selling Souvenaid, is funding the Scheltens study. Because of this, results may be influenced.
    (view changes)
    6:17 pm

Tuesday, December 7

  1. page home edited ... Nutrition labels (A Perry, Alyssa Owen, Sydnie Halverson, Heidi Wengreen) Sodium and health (…
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    Nutrition labels (A Perry, Alyssa Owen, Sydnie Halverson, Heidi Wengreen)
    Sodium and health (Sandra McCabe, Lindsay Cox)
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    Johnson, Shaina Aullman)Aullman, Heidi Wengreen)
    Obesity and weight management (Rachel Schroeder, Sheri Welch, Amy Lofley, Hilari Holmgren. Janae Decker)
    High fructose corn syrup (Heidi Savage, Anna Farrell, Jessie Chugg, Amanda Morley, Kara Smith)
    (view changes)
    2:27 pm
  2. page Nutrition labels edited ... The above headline, in my opinion, is a legitimate source and not just “noise." The autho…
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    The above headline, in my opinion, is a legitimate source and not just “noise." The authors of the original research study did perform a randomized study involving four different variations of traffic light nutrition labeling and seven hundred and ninety individuals. They found that consumers favored a consistent labeling format across all products. In addition, those who were shown the traffic light labels were five times more likely to identify healthier foods than those shown a single color version of the percentage daily intake label and three times more likely to do so than those shown a color-coded version of the daily intake label (Kelly, 2009). Therefore, I believe that a consistent labeling system would be the most beneficial for our country. The Traffic Light labeling system and the Smart Choices program are very simple and either could definitely be the future system of the United States.
    break
    Perry; Organic labels may trick dieters into overeating; MSNBC
    The news article "Organic Labels May Trick Dieters into Overeating" discusses the findings of two human experimental trials (Schuldt, 2010), which indicate that consumers may interpret organic food items as lower in calories than their conventional counterparts. The trials also indicate that consumers may view the consumption of organic foods, regardless of energy density, as sufficient to replace exercise.
    The first study included 114 college students who were asked to determine on a scale of 1 (fewer calories) to 7 (more calories), how organic Oreo cookies and conventional Oreo cookies compared to other brands of cookies, which were unspecified. The nutrition labels for both Oreo cookie varieties were provided. Organic Oreo cookies received lower calorie judgments (M = 3.9) than conventional ones (M = 5.17) and were deemed more appropriate to eat more often (M = 3.68) than conventional ones (M = 2.76). The scale of 1-7, however, is irregular and awkward for participants to use and may deter accurate results. Also, considering that one-half of 7 is 3.5, the students making calorie judgments solely for the organic cookies demonstrated the opinion that the organic cookies had slightly more calories than other brands of cookies, where M=3.9. Therefore, while organic Oreo cookies received a lower calorie judgment than conventional Oreo cookies, the study showed that all Oreo cookies were shown to be considered higher in calories than another brand, which was not explicitly mentioned in the article. Additionally, the findings that organic Oreo cookies were “more appropriate” to eat was not directly linked to calories, so other factors, such as environmentalism, may have impacted those results.
    The second study included 214 students that were presented with the scenario where “Susie”, a 20-year-old college student, was trying to lose weight by eating well and running three miles per day. On one particular night, Susie had a lot of homework, so after eating a healthy dinner and a dessert, she had to decide whether or not to go on her three-mile run. The participants’ leniency of Susie forgoing exercise was slightly greater when she chose an organic dessert than when she chose to eat no dessert at all. The participants were significantly more lenient toward Susie forgoing exercise when she chose an organic dessert versus a conventional dessert. The researchers asked the participants to judge whether or not Susie should go on her run “under the circumstances” instead of being more specific and linking her decision to exercise with the dessert she chose. “Under the circumstances” could be interpreted that since Susie was eating healthfully and had a lot of homework, it would be OK for her to skip a night of exercise - they were asking college students after all. Although this was an interesting study that may have demonstrated a causal relationship if conducted correctly, the underhanded tactics used in this research does not give the findings enough weight to be considered accurate.
    {http://myecoproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/usda-organic-label.jpg} Organic Seal
    The National Organic Program (NOP) developed their system of labeling foods with less than 100% organic ingredients in 2002 (Batte, 2006), so research in this area is relatively new and scarce. Because there are no comparable studies to determine if a health halo exists for organic food products, it may be appropriate to determine why consumers are interested in purchasing organic products and whether or not they are able to interpret nutrition labels. Evidence suggests (S Blondel, 2004) that the primary drive for French consumers to purchase organic foods is to reduce the risk of health and environmental concerns associated with pesticides. Concurrently, the higher price of organic food items averts consumers. In a human experimental trial (Temple, 2010), it was determined that having a visible nutrition label dramatically affected energy consumption choices at lunch. Interestingly, the results were not appreciably affected by those who had a class on nutrition labels and those who had not prior to the meal.
    My opinion is that the article "Organic Labels May Trick Dieters into Overeating" is more “noise” than “news”. Although it reviews the original literature quite well, the literature in and of itself seems fallacious. Through prior studies, it appears that consumers’ main interest in organic products is not because of the supposed difference in caloric value but their interest in ridding their bodies and the environment of the perceived dangers of pesticides (S Blondel, 2004). It has also been determined that approximately 80% of consumers use nutrition labels at least some of the time when making food purchasing decisions (Temple, 2010), and without supplementary education, consumers are able to make wiser choices when presented with this information (Temple, 2010). Based on the studies as of yet, it seems that this headline is not supported, but I do believe there is room to gain more information favoring this notion in future experiments.

    Halverson: Better Food Choices Made When Nutritional Knowledge Improved - Medicine Today
    The great debate over nutrition labels is fought on many fronts. This debate covers everything from where to put lables on the packing, how to list serving sizes, and what level of understanding to expect from consumers. All of these areas have been debated over and changed until we are left with the nutrition labels we see on our food today. But the question remains: Are the current nutrition labels effective effective?
    ...
    {Vyth Annotated Bibliography.doc}
    Schuldt JP, Schwarz N. The “organic” path to obesity? Organic claims influence calorie judgments and exercise recommendations. Judgment and Decision Making. 2010;5(3):144-150.Batte MT, Hooker NH, Haab TC, Beaverson J. Putting their money where their mouths are: Consumer willingness to pay for multi-ingredient, processed organic food products. Food Policy. 2007;32:145-159.
    {Schuldt Annotated Bibliography.doc}
    S Blondel,
    Blondel, M Javaheri.
    ...
    Symposium. 2004;15:245-252.
    {S Blondel Annotated Bibliography.doc}

    Temple JL, Johnson K, Recupero K, Suders H. Nutrition Labels Decrease Energy Intake in Adults Consuming Lunch in the Laboratory. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110:1094-1097.
    {Temple Annotated Bibliography.doc}
    McDonnell E, Probart C, Weirich JE, Hartman T, Bailey-Davis L. School competitive food policies: perceptions of Pennsylvania public high school foodservice directors and principals. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Feb;106(2):271-6.
    {McDonnell annotated bibliography.docx}
    (view changes)
    11:09 am
  3. page Probiotics edited ... PROBIOTICS {tough_bugs.jpg} ... consumed for centuries; often without any noticeable har…
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    PROBIOTICS
    {tough_bugs.jpg}
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    consumed for centuries; often without any noticeable harmful side effects.years. Additionally, consumers
    Probiotics are present in many forms and products. Probiotics may be found in a variety of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, kefir, milk, etc. There are also many probiotic supplements on the market that are readily available to consumers. But can consumers really depend on the touted health benefits of probiotics?
    Antibiotics: Any substance that can destroy or inhibit the growth of bacteria and similar microorganisms.
    (view changes)
    9:13 am
  4. page Probiotics edited ... There might be a day when the research that has been done to isolate certain strains and ident…
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    There might be a day when the research that has been done to isolate certain strains and identify how they are beneficial to health will be available to consumers. Until then, probiotics shouldn't be classified as having health benefits. They can only be classified as potentially having health benefits. I found this headline to have a bit of noise as well as news. However, the headline that would best suit this research would be closer to “Probiotic Lactobacillus Casei Found to Potentially Help Reduce Children’s Infections.”
    Holmgren: Probiotics May Help Ward Off Obesity: Study In Pregnant Women:Medical News Today
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    study was set in placedesigned to demonstrate
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    adiposity. The journal corresponding to thispublished study reviewed in the news article reportsreported that microbiota
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    (Collado, 2008). MicrobialIn addition microbial counts increased
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    trimester of pregnancy. Highpregnancy and high Bacteroide concentrations
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    Gut microbiota couldmay regulate obesity
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    gut microbiota start to show uphave been identified after the introduction of adult food in infants
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    early as two when they start to eat adult food, if thesetwo. If the microbiota are altered
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    (Reinhardt, 2009). In another study their findingsThe researchers indicate that
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    gut microbiota. TheyResearchers provided evidence
    The article titled Probiotics May Help Ward Off Obesity: Study In Pregnant Women is, in my opinion, both news and noise. In many of the studies I read, the women didn’t necessarily eat probiotics on its own to lose weight, they were given probiotics along with diet regulation, high fiber diets, and probiotics (Aaltonen, 2010). As healthy bacteria can be found in the gut of healthy woman, some studies suggest that taking a probiotic may influence the gut by causing a decrease in bad bacteria (Aaltonen, 2010), but this doesn’t necessarily make them lose weight. A higher number of probiotics were found in the gut of women who were healthier and had a normal weight (Kalliomaki, 2008). Gut microbiota and weight are linked and mother’s weight gain is affected by microbiota. There is indeed a difference between gut microbiota in normal weight and overweight people (Latinen, 2010). It may be important to keep in mind this is not the only way to lose weight but is a healthy choice when combined with diet and exercise.
    Tillotson/Hopkins: New study shows supplementing with probiotics may ease anxiety: Medical News Today
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  5. page Probiotics edited ... The article New Study: Probiotic Strain Boosts Immune Response to Flu Virus, discusses finding…
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    The article New Study: Probiotic Strain Boosts Immune Response to Flu Virus, discusses findings from a human trial (with 9 participants) and states “that taking probiotics regularly can boost the immune system in a specific way which helps the body give influenza A the boot” (Baker, 09). This statement implies that taking any type of probiotics can help prevent and fight off the flu by strengthening the immune system. In the study the article is based upon, blood samples were obtained from participants at the beginning of the study (before probiotic treatment) and again after taking a probiotic supplement for 30 days (Baron, 2010). The blood samples were treated with antigens and examined; each participant’s baseline sample served as control. The study explained how conclusions from the specific supplement they used (GanedenBC) may be strain specific. Also, the supplement used was designed to survive heat, gastric acidity and bile in order to reach the intestinal tract intact; while not all probiotics sold are, as the article implies. The results from the study also relied solely on their specific antigens applied to the blood samples of only 9 people.
    Recent research on probiotics preventing infection and boosting the immune system varies. One study, involving 326 children, found a combination of probiotic strains reduced incidence and duration of fever, coughing, runny nose, and reduced incidence of antibiotic use (Leyer, 09). Another study, with 1072 participants, found that common infectious disease (including the flu) duration was reduced, and the incidence and duration of upper respiratory tract infections were reduced in non-institutionalized elderly (Guillermard, 2010). Probiotic supplementation and the immune response to an influenza vaccination were examined by one study, finding that probiotics enhanced the immune response to the influenza vaccine (Olivares, 07). Another study concluded that the intake of certain strains of probiotics reduces the risk of acquiring common cold infections (Berggren, 2010). However, there are other studies in which probiotics did not have a significant reduction in common cold incidence or length (Baron, 2010).
    ...
    opinion, the statement,statement from the news article,article saying that
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    fight the fluflu, is over-generalized.
    Neilson; Preventive Probiotics Cut Cold Symptoms in Kids; Medpage Today
    A recent news headline in Med Page Today titled “Preventive Probiotics Cut Cold Symptoms in Kids” reports on a study conducted on 326 children ages three to five years old in a daycare in Jinhua City, China (Leyer, 2010). The study examined the effects of probiotics on cold and flu symptoms and duration. The article reports on the three variables of the experiment- the control group that received plain milk, a variable group that received probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus twice per day mixed with milk, and another variable group that received a combination of probiotic strains L Acidophilus with Bifidobacterium Animalis mixed with milk. Supplementation showed a 53-73% reduction of fever incidence, a 41-62% reduction of coughing, and a 68-84% reduction of antibiotics use in regards to single strain and mix of strain probiotics, respectively. On average, probiotic intake decreased duration of illness by 32-48% (Leyer, 2010). Though results seem significant, researchers and reporter fail to address consistency of probiotic administration on days where the children weren’t at school (i.e. weekends, sick days, vacations) which may affect results. There also is no significant research besides this experiment to validate the results.
    (view changes)
    8:50 am
  6. page Probiotics edited ... PROBIOTICS {tough_bugs.jpg} ... Probiotics are also often viewed Probiotics are prese…
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    PROBIOTICS
    {tough_bugs.jpg}
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    Probiotics are also often viewed
    Probiotics are present in many forms and products. Probiotics may be found in a variety of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, kefir, milk, etc. There are also many probiotic supplements on the market that are readily available to consumers. But can consumers really depend on the touted health benefits of probiotics?
    Antibiotics: Any substance that can destroy or inhibit the growth of bacteria and similar microorganisms.
    (view changes)
    8:44 am
  7. page Probiotics edited ... PROBIOTICS {tough_bugs.jpg} ... or medications. Probiotics Probiotics are present …
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    PROBIOTICS
    {tough_bugs.jpg}
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    or medications. Probiotics
    Probiotics
    are present
    Antibiotics: Any substance that can destroy or inhibit the growth of bacteria and similar microorganisms.
    Bacteria: Microscopic single-celled organisms lacking a nucleus. They are structured as either rod-shaped, sphere-shaped or spiral-shaped. They can be aerobic or anaerobic, or facultative anaerobic.
    (view changes)
    8:44 am
  8. page Probiotics edited ...  Poulsen; New Study: Probiotic Strain Boosts Immune Response to Flu Virus; NaturalNews.com …
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    Poulsen; New Study: Probiotic Strain Boosts Immune Response to Flu Virus; NaturalNews.com
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    This statement gives the ideaimplies that taking
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    based upon, participant blood samples were takenobtained from participants at the
    Recent research on probiotics preventing infection and boosting the immune system varies. One study, involving 326 children, found a combination of probiotic strains reduced incidence and duration of fever, coughing, runny nose, and reduced incidence of antibiotic use (Leyer, 09). Another study, with 1072 participants, found that common infectious disease (including the flu) duration was reduced, and the incidence and duration of upper respiratory tract infections were reduced in non-institutionalized elderly (Guillermard, 2010). Probiotic supplementation and the immune response to an influenza vaccination were examined by one study, finding that probiotics enhanced the immune response to the influenza vaccine (Olivares, 07). Another study concluded that the intake of certain strains of probiotics reduces the risk of acquiring common cold infections (Berggren, 2010). However, there are other studies in which probiotics did not have a significant reduction in common cold incidence or length (Baron, 2010).
    TheIn my opinion, the statement, from
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    flu is over-generalized in my opinion.over-generalized. Recent research does supportsupports the theory
    Neilson; Preventive Probiotics Cut Cold Symptoms in Kids; Medpage Today
    A recent news headline in Med Page Today titled “Preventive Probiotics Cut Cold Symptoms in Kids” reports on a study conducted on 326 children ages three to five years old in a daycare in Jinhua City, China (Leyer, 2010). The study examined the effects of probiotics on cold and flu symptoms and duration. The article reports on the three variables of the experiment- the control group that received plain milk, a variable group that received probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus twice per day mixed with milk, and another variable group that received a combination of probiotic strains L Acidophilus with Bifidobacterium Animalis mixed with milk. Supplementation showed a 53-73% reduction of fever incidence, a 41-62% reduction of coughing, and a 68-84% reduction of antibiotics use in regards to single strain and mix of strain probiotics, respectively. On average, probiotic intake decreased duration of illness by 32-48% (Leyer, 2010). Though results seem significant, researchers and reporter fail to address consistency of probiotic administration on days where the children weren’t at school (i.e. weekends, sick days, vacations) which may affect results. There also is no significant research besides this experiment to validate the results.
    (view changes)
    8:43 am

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